Mother of Madness: The Cersei Lannister Scene Thrones Fans Choose to not Remember

Every character on Game of Thrones has a tragic backstory before the series starts, except for, perhaps the Stark kids, who see their fair share of trauma early on in the series, and Joffrey, who doesn’t need a tragedy to act like a jerk. Other than that, just about everyone has a tragedy in their past: Daenerys… Continue reading Mother of Madness: The Cersei Lannister Scene Thrones Fans Choose to not Remember

And Now For Something Completely Different: Fargo (FX) and the Art of Spinning-Off

“This is a true story.” Fargo is a masterpiece. No, I’m not talking about the Coen Brothers film, though that is a masterpiece as well. I’m talking about the FX series by the same name which debuted in 2014. 18 years after its release, Fargo was still beloved, and there wasn’t any need for it to… Continue reading And Now For Something Completely Different: Fargo (FX) and the Art of Spinning-Off

The Batman Singularity: How the Caped Crusader has Impacted the Superhero Genre

Batman, it seems, is everywhere. The success of Batman has lead to “The Brooding Vigilante” becoming a common archetype throughout popular culture, or at least just in the superhero genre. This is what we call the Batman Singularity: that all entertainment will eventually be Batman. This, of course, is starting to cause a few problems.

Do You Believe in Magic: Religion in the World of Harry Potter

There is one major facet of life we never truly see in the Magical world: Religion. The fundamental question regarding religions in the Wizarding World is this: if muggles use religion to explain the unexplained, how does a world of magic, that already goes beyond the laws of the natural world, regard things that are beyond explanation? Do they have any beliefs? Is there anything that would push beyond the bounds of the wizarding world? Do they regard Harry’s miraculous survival(s)?

“His Superpower is What?”: Ant-Man and Reaching Saturation Point in Superhero Cinema, Phase II

I tried to think of a neat, anecdotal, opening to this post, but nothing says it quite as eloquently as blatantly stating fact: Ant-man is a movie. If you had said this ten or fifteen years ago, comic fans would have been incredulous, and everyone else would ask who the hell Ant-man was.

Saturation Point, Phase I: What Age of Ultron Indicates about Superhero Movies

“Age of Ultron must have felt bloated to non-fans. However, this “bloated” film still took in almost 1.4 billion (!) dollars, despite receiving slightly less favorable reviews than its predecessor. Incorporating so many characters and stories that people who love comics know exceptionally well, but might seem confusing to outside viewers.”

The Man with No Chill: A Moral Analysis of The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

“Certainly one of the greatest film cowboys, and certainly the best known of Clint Eastwood’s roles. Other than perhaps James Bond and Han Solo, no movie hero has proven to be as badass or uniquely masculine as the Dollars’ trilogy protagonist. However, if we are to look at the trilogy’s most famous installment, The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, there is something very interesting to be noted about our hero; namely, that he isn’t a hero at all.”